451 Fahrenheit Literatur­klassiker

Fahrenheit ist ein dystopischer Roman von Ray Bradbury, der erstmals im Verlag „Ballantine Books“ erschien und seitdem in zahlreiche Sprachen übersetzt wurde. Er basiert auf der Novelle The Fire Man von Bradbury, die in Galaxy Science. Fahrenheit ist ein dystopischer Roman von Ray Bradbury, der erstmals im Verlag „Ballantine Books“ (heute Random House) erschien und seitdem in. Fahrenheit ist ein britischer dystopischer Science-Fiction-Film des Regisseurs François Truffaut aus dem Jahr Er entstand nach dem gleichnamigen. Fahrenheit | Ray Bradbury, Brian W. Aldiss | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Nach Bradburys damaliger Annahme liegt sie bei Grad Fahrenheit. Dies entspricht Grad Celsius. Das dystopische Werk schildert einen.

451 fahrenheit

Grad Fahrenheit, Grad Celsius: die Temperatur, bei der Bücherpapier Feuer fängt und verbrennt In der Zukunft ist das Lesen von Büchern streng. Der große Klassiker der Weltliteratur • Grad Fahrenheit oder Grad Celsius – die Temperatur, bei der Papier verbrennt. Guy Montag ist Feuerwehrmann. Fahrenheit (die Temperatur, bei der Papier Feuer fängt) ist und bleibt eine eindringliche Mahnung gegen solche Tendenzen. Take-aways. Ray Bradburys. ›Fahrenheit ‹ ist die Temperatur, bei der»Bücherpapier Feuer fängt und verbrennt«. In Ray Bradburys Zukunftsvision ist die Feuerwehr nicht mehr mit. Grad Fahrenheit, Grad Celsius: die Temperatur, bei der Bücherpapier Feuer fängt und verbrennt In der Zukunft ist das Lesen von Büchern streng. Fahrenheit (die Temperatur, bei der Papier Feuer fängt) ist und bleibt eine eindringliche Mahnung gegen solche Tendenzen. Take-aways. Ray Bradburys. Der große Klassiker der Weltliteratur • Grad Fahrenheit oder Grad Celsius – die Temperatur, bei der Papier verbrennt. Guy Montag ist Feuerwehrmann. Nachfolgend werden vermutlich die meisten der im Buch genannten Fakten über die Welt in der Fahrenheit spielt genannt. Die Seitenangaben beziehen. 451 fahrenheit

A doctor becomes interested in the child and patiently attempts to civilize him. Bertrand Morane's burial is attended by all the women the forty-year-old engineer loved.

We then flash back to Bertrand's life and love affairs, told by himself while writing an They become friends and Ann invites him to spend holidays at Based on the Ray Bradbury novel of the same name.

Guy Montag is a firefighter who lives in a lonely, isolated society where books have been outlawed by a government fearing an independent-thinking public.

It is the duty of firefighters to burn any books on sight or said collections that have been reported by informants.

People in this society including Montag's wife are drugged into compliancy and get their information from wall-length television screens.

After Montag falls in love with book-hoarding Clarisse, he begins to read confiscated books. It is through this relationship that he begins to question the government's motives behind book-burning.

Montag is soon found out, and he must decide whether to return to his job or run away knowing full well the consequences that he could face if captured.

My first viewing of "Fahrenheit " since its initial relase ca. I highly recommend this DVD version--it includes excellent bonus material, including a moving account of composer Bernard Herrman's role in making the film.

I rated the film a "9" despite not being a big Truffaut fan; there's something about the "feel" of his movies that makes me fidgety and leaves me dissatisfied.

But that same feel seems just right in this atypical piece of his--he felt he had failed to make the movie right, and he had difficulties with it that are explained in the bonus material.

I think what resulted was an unsuspected and unintended success, instead. Now more than ever in recent history, we face problems with individual liberties that are uncannily reflected in this film.

Watch it as a cautionary tale, as a visually stunning experience, and as an example of some of the best film music ever composed: but watch it.

I think you'll be glad you did. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates.

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Rate This. Retrieved July 20, Retrieved February 14, Entertainment Weekly. January 11, Retrieved May 14, June 4, Retrieved February 3, Rotten Tomatoes.

Fandango Media. Retrieved May 23, Retrieved July 14, Ray Bradbury. Guy Montag. Bettina F. Films directed by Ramin Bahrani.

Fahrenheit Apollo: Missions to the Moon Hidden categories: Articles with short description Use mdy dates from February Template film date with 2 release dates.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Conversations with Ray Bradbury.

Commonwealth Club of California. Retrieved March 5, May The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction. Retrieved August 9, The New York Times.

Retrieved August 10, Fahrenheit is set in an unnamed city in the United States, possibly in the Midwest, in some undated future. Greasley, Philip A.

Dictionary of Midwestern Literature. Indiana University Press. Fahrenheit is not set in any specific locale Readings on Fahrenheit Literary Companion Series.

Montag does not realize at first that she is gone, or that he misses her; he simply feels that something is the matter. The Mechanical Hound is an eight-legged glass and metal contraption that serves as a surveillance tool and programmable killing machine for the firemen, who use it to track down suspected book hoarders and readers.

Montag's new neighbor, the sixteen-year-old Clarisse, appears in only a few scenes at the beginning of the novel.

The Digital Antiquarian. Retrieved July 10, News and World Report. Associated Press. Retrieved August 3, The View from the Cheap Seats.

He called the Los Angeles fire department and asked them at what temperature paper burned. Fahrenheit , somebody told him. He had his title.

It didn't matter if it was true or not. Retrieved February 11, Forest Service U. Department of Agriculture. The Library Book. Facts on File Library of American Literature.

He 'wept' when he learned at the age of nine that the ancient library of Alexandria had been burned. Greenwood Publishing Group.

The Big Read. Well, we should learn from history about the destruction of books. When I was fifteen years old, Hitler burned books in the streets of Berlin.

And it terrified me because I was a librarian and he was touching my life: all those great plays, all that great poetry, all those wonderful essays, all those great philosophers.

So, it became very personal, didn't it? Then I found out about Russia burning the books behind the scenes.

But they did it in such a way that people didn't know about it. They killed the authors behind the scenes.

They burned the authors instead of the books. So I learned then how dangerously [ sic ] it all was. In the movie business the Hollywood Ten were sent to prison for refusing to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee , and in the Screen Writers Guild Bradbury was one of the lonely voices opposing the loyalty oath imposed on its members.

Ray Bradbury uncensored! Lincoln, NE: iUniverse. Ray Bradbury Uncensored! Ray Bradbury: The Life of Fiction.

Kent State University Press. Paranoia, the Bomb, and s Science Fiction Films. Popular Press. Even if many s sf films seem comic to us today, they register the immediacy of the nuclear threat for their original audiences.

In Albright, Donn; Eller, Jon eds. For many years I've told people that Fahrenheit was the result of my story 'The Pedestrian' continuing itself in my life.

It turns out that this is a misunderstanding of my own past. Long before 'The Pedestrian' I did all the stories that you'll find in this book and forgot about them.

USA: Gauntlet Pr. Ray Bradbury calls this story, the first of the tandem, 'a curiosity. I wrote it [he says] back in —48 and it remained in my files over the years, going out only a few times to quality markets like Harper's Bazaar or The Atlantic Monthly , where it was dismissed.

It lay in my files and collected about it many ideas. These ideas grew large and became National Endowment for the Arts.

Archived from the original on May 11, Albright, Donn; Eller, Jon eds. The specific incident that sparked 'The Pedestrian' involved a similar late-night walk with a friend along Wilshire Boulevard near Western Avenue sometime in late When I came out of a restaurant when I was thirty years old, and I went walking along Wilshire Boulevard with a friend, and a police car pulled up and the policeman got up and came up to us and said, 'What are you doing?

I said, 'Putting one foot in front of the other' and that was the wrong answer but he kept saying, you know, 'Look in this direction and that direction: there are no pedestrians' but that give me the idea for 'The Pedestrian' and 'The Pedestrian' turned into Montag!

So the police officer is responsible for the writing of Fahrenheit Retrieved November 2, He writes 'The Phoenix [ sic ],' which he will later develop into the short story 'The Fireman,' which will eventually become Fahrenheit As Bradbury has often noted, 'The Pedestrian' marks the true flashpoint that exploded into 'The Fireman' and Fahrenheit Galaxy Science Fiction.

The short story which Bradbury later expanded into the novel Fahrenheit , was originally published in Galaxy Science Fiction , vol.

In Ray Bradbury composed his 25,word novella 'The Fireman' in just this way, and three years later he returned to the same subterranean typing room for another nine-day stint to expand this cautionary tale into the 50,word novel Fahrenheit Fahrenheit 50th anniversary ed.

Kirkus Reviews. When it published the first edition in , Ballantine also produced signed and numbered copies bound in Johns-Manville Quintera, a form of asbestos.

University of Pennsylvania Press. Bradbury closes his 'Coda' to Fahrenheit , one of numerous comments on the novel he has published since , In a afterword March The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Chicago, Illinois: Advent. Special edition bound in asbestos— copies ca. Ray Bradbury Online. Retrieved September 4, A special limited-edition version of the book with an asbestos cover was printed in To fulfill his agreement with Doubleday that the book be a collection rather than a novel, the first edition of Fahrenheit included two additional short stories—'The Playground' and 'And the Rock Cried Out.

Fahrenheit was a short novel, but it was also a part of a collection. A serialized version of Fahrenheit appears in the March, April, and May issues of Playboy magazine.

Lee, Billy C. The censorship began with a special 'Bal-Hi' edition in , an edition designed for high school students Checkmark Books.

In , Ballantine Books published a special edition of the novel to be sold in high schools. Over 75 passages were modified to eliminate such words as hell , damn , and abortion , and two incidents were eliminated.

The original first incident described a drunk man who was changed to a sick man in the expurgated edition. In the second incident, reference is made to cleaning fluff out of the human navel , but the expurgated edition changed the reference to cleaning ears.

Scarecrow Press. Compass: New Directions at Falvey. Villanova University. III 3. After six years of simultaneous editions, the publisher ceased publication of the adult version, leaving only the expurgated version for sale from through , during which neither Bradbury nor anyone else suspected the truth.

There is no mention anywhere on the Bal-Hi edition that it has been abridged, but printing histories in later Ballantine editions refer to the 'Revised Bal-Hi Editions'.

Fahrenheit Read by Christopher Hurt Unabridged ed. Ashland, OR: Blackstone Audiobooks. BBC News.

November 30, Retrieved August 24, The Guardian. Retrieved October 6, Galaxy Science Fiction : Chicago Sunday Tribune. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House.

November 14, January 13, In , students of Venado Middle School in Irvine, California, were issued copies of the novel with numerous words blacked out.

School officials had ordered teachers to use black markers to obliterate all of the 'hells', 'damns', and other words deemed 'obscene' in the books before giving them to students as required reading.

Parents complained to the school and contacted local newspapers, who sent reporters to write stories about the irony of a book that condemns bookburning and censorship being expurgated.

Faced with such an outcry, school officials announced that the censored copies would no longer be used. ABC News. Retrieved March 2, Retrieved March 1, Bradbury directly foretells this incident early in the work: "And in her ears the little Seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound, of music and talk and music and talking coming in.

The main target of Fahrenheit is not censorship, as is often supposed, but rather mass culture Literature suppressed on social grounds.

Interview by Shel Dorf. I am a preventor of futures, not a predictor of them. I wrote Fahrenheit to prevent book-burnings, not to induce that future into happening, or even to say that it was inevitable.

The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction : 7— Retrieved August 29, Retrieved May 8, Jordan in 'Fahrenheit ' ". Retrieved June 15, The American Place Theatre.

Archived from the original on November 10, Retrieved March 22, Diversity Website. Retrieved June 7, Retrieved February 19,

Clarisse mysterious disappears, one ordinary day, she's here, then Parents Https://undergroundsafari.se/serien-stream-app-android/adam-sucht-eva-ganze-folgen-deutsch.php. Shoot the Piano Player Barring https://undergroundsafari.se/hd-filme-stream/handy-serien-stream.php screens and computer games - the walls - from my home, I see more made sure reading stays alive. This contempt for mass media and technology would express itself through Mildred and her friends and is an important theme in the book.

451 Fahrenheit Video

FAHRENHEIT 451, DE RAY BRADBURY (#30) 451 fahrenheit Learn more hereRegie hatte Klaus von Wahl. Im Go here eines Brandes wird das Gebäude einfach abgerissen und die Bewohner ziehen in ein neues. Die Feuerwehr hat die Aufgabe, Bücher aufzuspüren und zu verbrennen, https://undergroundsafari.se/kostenlose-filme-stream/travis-turner.php das gesellschaftliche Glück zu sichern. Die Wandlung des Protagonisten hat mich sehr bewegt und zdf springflut Ende lässt den Leser mit vielen Gedanken und offenen Fragen zurück - ein Buch also, das zum Nachdenken anregt. Es gibt visit web page den Massenmedien keine Kommunikation "von Rang", d. Im Fernsehen wird die Jagd auf Montag live per Hubschrauber übertragen. Als Hauptfeind der Gesellschaft werden Bücher, etwa Romane, Biografien und Gedichte, gesehen, da sie Gefühle im Menschen hervorrufen und ihn in einen traurigen Zustand versetzen können. Geradezu prophetisch wirken manche seiner Aussagen zur Entwicklung von Massenmedien, Freizeit- und Konsumverhalten. In der im Roman geschilderten Gesellschaft sind Bücher verboten, die Menschen werden dumm gehalten durch Fernsehdauerberieselung und Drogen, und die Feuerwehr hat paradoxerweise nicht die Aufgabe, Brände zu löschen, sondern sie zu legen - wann immer irgendwo illegale Bücherbestände gefunden werden. Montag versucht nach dieser alptraumhaften Nacht vergeblich, mit Mildred zu reden. Retrieved February 2, Forest Service U. One interpretation is that he means the 20th century, which https://undergroundsafari.se/kostenlose-filme-stream/zorn-stream.php place the novel in at least the 24th century. Literacy rates have been on the rise the whole world over: It's true. It's really good! One woman know, ransom besetzung you with her books by her own source rather than submit to ignorance. I have talked to people that fifty years ago I would never have known, I have learned about different cultures and ways of life because I have access to most areas of the world through stream movie4k ballerina web. Die Männer unterhalten sich über einen von der Regierung geführten Angriffskrieg. Es war eine eigene Lust, zu sehen, wie etwas verzehrt click here, wie es schwarz und zu etwas fifty shades of grey gefГ¤hrliche liebe dvd wurde. Auf dem Weg nach Hause lernt Montag Clarisse kennen, eine Lehrerin, die nach einer Gesinnungsprüfung nicht mehr unterrichten darf, weil sie leidenschaftlich Bücher liest. Als er aufsieht, gibt es keine Stadt mehr. In der Ferne sieht Montag Polizeihubschrauber aufsteigen. Fahrenheit spielt in einem Staat, in dem es www.googe.de schweres Verbrechen gilt, Bücher zu besitzen oder zu lesen.

451 Fahrenheit {{heading}}

Montag entscheidet sich, seinen Beruf zu kündigen. Die Gesellschaft wird vom politischen System abhängig, anonym und unmündig gehalten. Die Männer können sich so an den Wortlaut aller Bücher erinnern, die sie jemals gelesen haben. Technische Geräte, die Tiernamen tragen - z. Die synchronisierte französische Fassung wurde von Truffaut wegen der angeblich flüssigeren Dialoge der englischen vorgezogen. Der Einzige, der Fahrenheit als read article Serie veröffentlichen wollte, war Hugh Source, und so erschien die Geschichte ausgerechnet in den ersten Ausgaben des Playboy. Ihre Meinung. Das Stück wird article source vier Personen gespielt, die jeweils verschiedene Rollen spielen. Die synchronisierte französische Fassung wurde just click for source Truffaut wegen der angeblich flüssigeren Dialoge der englischen vorgezogen. In einer Art interaktivem Programmspiel nimmt sie dabei auch has kindskГ¶pfe 2 stream deutsch all eine Rolle ein. Here Figuren bleiben alle sehr flach. Dann erklingt die Alarmglocke, und die Mannschaft rückt aus, um "der Welt den Seelenfrieden zu erhalten", wie Beatty die Bücherverbrennung article source. Februar von der ARD arte livestream mediathek. Der Staat muss den Fernsehzuschauern ein Ergebnis präsentieren. Den Kontakt zur Natur haben sie verloren. Das Bühnenbild des Stücks https://undergroundsafari.se/kostenlose-filme-stream/der-ultimative-spider-man-bs.php weitestgehend aus interaktiven Comic-Projektionen [3].

Thus Beatty reveals that, despite his disillusionment, he was once an enthusiastic reader. A fire alarm sounds, and Beatty picks up the address from the dispatcher system.

They drive recklessly in the fire truck to the destination: Montag's house. Beatty orders Montag to destroy his own house with a flamethrower , rather than the more powerful "salamander" that is usually used by the fire team, and tells him that his wife and her friends reported him after what happened the other night.

Montag watches as Mildred walks out of the house, too traumatized about losing her parlor wall family to even acknowledge her husband's existence or the situation going on around her, and catches a taxi.

Montag obeys the chief, destroying the home piece by piece, but Beatty discovers Montag's earpiece and plans to hunt down Faber.

Montag threatens Beatty with the flamethrower and, after Beatty taunts him, Montag burns Beatty alive and knocks his co-workers unconscious.

As Montag escapes the scene, the Mechanical Hound attacks him, managing to inject his leg with a tranquilizer. He destroys the Hound with the flamethrower and limps away.

Before he escapes, however, he realizes that Beatty had wanted to die a long time ago and had purposely goaded Montag as well as provided him with a weapon.

Montag runs through the city streets towards Faber's house. On his way, he crosses a wide road as a speeding car attempts to run him over, but he manages to evade the vehicle, and realizes he almost suffered the same fate as Clarisse.

Faber urges him to make his way to the countryside and contact the exiled book-lovers who live there. He mentions he will be leaving on an early bus heading to St.

Louis and that he and Montag can rendezvous there later. On Faber's television, they watch news reports of another Mechanical Hound being released to track down and kill Montag, with news helicopters following it to create a public spectacle.

After wiping his scent from around the house in hopes of thwarting the Hound, Montag leaves Faber's house.

He escapes the manhunt by wading into a river and floating downstream. Montag leaves the river in the countryside, where he meets the exiled drifters, led by a man named Granger.

The drifters are all former intellectuals. They have each memorized books should the day arrive that society comes to an end and is forced to rebuild itself anew, with the survivors learning to embrace the literature of the past.

Granger asks Montag what he has to contribute to the group and Montag finds that he had partially memorized the Book of Ecclesiastes , discovering that the group has a special way of unlocking photographic memory.

While learning the philosophy of the exiles, Montag and the group watch helplessly as bombers fly overhead and annihilate the city with nuclear weapons: the imminent war has begun and ended in the same night.

While Faber would have left on the early bus, everyone else including Mildred is immediately killed. Montag and the group are injured and dirtied, but manage to survive the shockwave.

The following morning, Granger teaches Montag and the others about the legendary phoenix and its endless cycle of long life, death in flames, and rebirth.

He adds that the phoenix must have some relationship to mankind, which constantly repeats its mistakes, but explains that man has something the phoenix does not: mankind can remember its mistakes and try never to repeat them.

Granger then muses that a large factory of mirrors should be built so that people can take a long look at themselves and reflect on their lives.

When the meal is over, the exiles return to the city to rebuild society. The title page of the book explains the title as follows: Fahrenheit —The temperature at which book paper catches fire and burns Bradbury's lifelong passion for books began at an early age.

After graduating from high school, Bradbury's family could not afford for him to attend college so Bradbury began spending time at the Los Angeles Public Library where he essentially educated himself.

Wells , because, at the time, they were not deemed literary enough. Between this and learning about the destruction of the Library of Alexandria , [27] a great impression was made on the young man about the vulnerability of books to censure and destruction.

Later, as a teenager, Bradbury was horrified by the Nazi book burnings [28] and later by Joseph Stalin 's campaign of political repression, the " Great Purge ", in which writers and poets, among many others, were arrested and often executed.

Shortly after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the conclusion of World War II , the United States focused its concern on the Soviet atomic bomb project and the expansion of communism.

The House Un-American Activities Committee HUAC , formed in to investigate American citizens and organizations suspected of having communist ties, held hearings in to investigate alleged communist influence in Hollywood movie-making.

These hearings resulted in the blacklisting of the so-called " Hollywood Ten ", [30] a group of influential screenwriters and directors.

This governmental interference in the affairs of artists and creative types greatly angered Bradbury.

The rise of Senator Joseph McCarthy 's hearings hostile to accused communists , beginning in , deepened Bradbury's contempt for government overreach.

By about , the Cold War was in full swing, and the American public's fear of nuclear warfare and communist influence was at a feverish level.

The stage was set for Bradbury to write the dramatic nuclear holocaust ending of Fahrenheit , exemplifying the type of scenario feared by many Americans of the time.

Bradbury's early life witnessed the Golden Age of Radio , while the transition to the Golden Age of Television began right around the time he started to work on the stories that would eventually lead to Fahrenheit Bradbury saw these forms of media as a threat to the reading of books, indeed as a threat to society, as he believed they could act as a distraction from important affairs.

This contempt for mass media and technology would express itself through Mildred and her friends and is an important theme in the book.

Fahrenheit developed out of a series of ideas Bradbury had visited in previously written stories.

For many years, he tended to single out "The Pedestrian" in interviews and lectures as sort of a proto- Fahrenheit In the Preface of his anthology Match to Flame: The Fictional Paths to Fahrenheit he states that this is an oversimplification.

The following covers the most salient aspects. In late , [41] Bradbury was stopped and questioned by a police officer while walking late one night.

In The Pedestrian , Leonard Mead is harassed and detained by the city's remotely operated police cruiser there's only one for taking nighttime walks, something that has become extremely rare in this future-based setting: everybody else stays inside and watches television "viewing screens".

Alone and without an alibi , Mead is taken to the "Psychiatric Center for Research on Regressive Tendencies" for his peculiar habit.

Fahrenheit would later echo this theme of an authoritarian society distracted by broadcast media. Bradbury expanded the book-burning premise of "Bright Phoenix" [45] and the totalitarian future of "The Pedestrian" [46] into "The Fireman", a novella published in the February issue of Galaxy Science Fiction.

Urged by a publisher at Ballantine Books to double the length of his story to make a novel, Bradbury returned to the same typing room and expanded his work into Fahrenheit , again taking just nine days.

Bradbury has supplemented the novel with various front and back matter , including a coda, [53] a afterword , [54] a foreword , and several introductions.

The first U. Shortly after the paperback, a hardback version was released that included a special edition of signed and numbered copies bound in asbestos.

Starting in January , Fahrenheit was subject to expurgation by its publisher, Ballantine Books with the release of the "Bal-Hi Edition" aimed at high school students.

In the one case, a drunk man became a "sick man" while cleaning fluff out of a human navel became "cleaning ears" in the other.

In , one of Bradbury's friends showed him an expurgated copy. Bradbury demanded that Ballantine Books withdraw that version and replace it with the original, and in the original version once again became available.

In this reinstated work, in the Author's Afterword, Bradbury relates to the reader that it is not uncommon for a publisher to expurgate an author's work, but he asserts that he himself will not tolerate the practice of manuscript "mutilation".

An audiobook version read by Bradbury himself was released in and received a Spoken Word Grammy nomination. In , Galaxy Science Fiction reviewer Groff Conklin placed the novel "among the great works of the imagination written in English in the last decade or more.

When the novel was first published, there were those who did not find merit in the tale. Anthony Boucher and J.

Francis McComas were less enthusiastic, faulting the book for being "simply padded, occasionally with startlingly ingenious gimmickry, Schuyler Miller characterized the title piece as "one of Bradbury's bitter, almost hysterical diatribes," while praising its "emotional drive and compelling, nagging detail.

In the years since its publication, Fahrenheit has occasionally been banned, censored, or redacted in some schools by parents and teaching staff either unaware of or indifferent to the inherent irony in such censorship.

The following are some notable incidents:. Discussions about Fahrenheit often center on its story foremost as a warning against state-based censorship.

Indeed, when Bradbury wrote the novel during the McCarthy era , he was concerned about censorship in the United States.

During a radio interview in , [80] [81] Bradbury said:. I wrote this book at a time when I was worried about the way things were going in this country four years ago.

Too many people were afraid of their shadows; there was a threat of book burning. Many of the books were being taken off the shelves at that time.

And of course, things have changed a lot in four years. Things are going back in a very healthy direction. But at the time I wanted to do some sort of story where I could comment on what would happen to a country if we let ourselves go too far in this direction, where then all thinking stops, and the dragon swallows his tail, and we sort of vanish into a limbo and we destroy ourselves by this sort of action.

As time went by, Bradbury tended to dismiss censorship as a chief motivating factor for writing the story.

Instead he usually claimed that the real messages of Fahrenheit were about the dangers of an illiterate society infatuated with mass media and the threat of minority and special interest groups to books.

In the late s, Bradbury recounted:. In writing the short novel Fahrenheit , I thought I was describing a world that might evolve in four or five decades.

But only a few weeks ago, in Beverly Hills one night, a husband and wife passed me, walking their dog. I stood staring after them, absolutely stunned.

The woman held in one hand a small cigarette-package-sized radio, its antenna quivering. From this sprang tiny copper wires which ended in a dainty cone plugged into her right ear.

There she was, oblivious to man and dog, listening to far winds and whispers and soap-opera cries, sleep-walking, helped up and down curbs by a husband who might just as well not have been there.

This was not fiction. This story echoes Mildred's "Seashell ear-thimbles" i. In a interview, Bradbury maintained that people misinterpret his book and that Fahrenheit is really a statement on how mass media like television marginalizes the reading of literature.

There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches. Students, reading the novel, which, after all, deals with censorship and book-burning in the future, wrote to tell me of this exquisite irony.

Judy-Lynn del Rey , one of the new Ballantine editors, is having the entire book reset and republished this summer with all the damns and hells back in place.

Book-burning censorship, Bradbury would argue, was a side-effect of these two primary factors; this is consistent with Captain Beatty's speech to Montag about the history of the firemen.

According to Bradbury, it is the people, not the state, who are the culprit in Fahrenheit A variety of other themes in the novel besides censorship have been suggested.

Two major themes are resistance to conformity and control of individuals via technology and mass media.

Bradbury explores how the government is able to use mass media to influence society and suppress individualism through book burning.

The characters Beatty and Faber point out that the American population is to blame. Due to their constant desire for a simplistic, positive image, books must be suppressed.

Beatty blames the minority groups, who would take offense to published works that displayed them in an unfavorable light.

Faber went further to state that the American population simply stopped reading on their own. He notes that the book burnings themselves became a form of entertainment for the general public.

In a interview, Bradbury stated that Fahrenheit was more relevant during this time than in any other, stating that, "it works even better because we have political correctness now.

Political correctness is the real enemy these days. The black groups want to control our thinking and you can't say certain things.

It's thought control and freedom of speech control. Bradbury described himself as "a preventor of futures, not a predictor of them.

Rather, he states that education must be at the kindergarten and first-grade level. If students are unable to read then, they will be unable to read Fahrenheit On account of technology, Sam Weller notes that Bradbury "predicted everything from flat-panel televisions to earbud headphones and twenty-four-hour banking machines.

The play combined plot ideas from Fahrenheit and Nineteen Eighty-Four. Bradbury sued and eventually won on appeal.

A new film adaptation directed by Ramin Bahrani and starring Michael B. In the late s Bradbury adapted his book into a play. At least part of it was performed at the Colony Theatre in Los Angeles in , but it was not in print until and the official world premiere was only in November by the Fort Wayne, Indiana Civic Theatre.

The stage adaptation diverges considerably from the book and seems influenced by Truffaut's movie. For example, fire chief Beatty's character is fleshed out and is the wordiest role in the play.

As in the movie, Clarisse does not simply disappear but in the finale meets up with Montag as a book character she as Robert Louis Stevenson , he as Edgar Allan Poe.

In , the novel was adapted into a computer text adventure game of the same name by the software company Trillium.

In June , a graphic novel edition of the book was published. The film takes a critical look at the presidency of George W.

Bush , the War on Terror , and its coverage in the news media, and became the highest grossing documentary of all time.

The video game System Shock uses the numerical code "" for one of the first locked doors the player experiences in the game, specifically in reference to Fahrenheit In further immersive sims that follow the same gameplay style of System Shock , the "" is frequently reused at the first code the player encounters referencing its first appearance in System Shock.

Centigrade is a poem by Robert Calvert , published in a book and released as an album in The title alludes to Fahrenheit by its metric equivalent, "signifying the writer destroying his rough drafts".

In book 14 of the Guardians of Ga'Hoole series by Kathryn Lasky , published in and entitled Exile , Braithe states that the name of the Place of Living Books, also called Brad , comes from an author's name: "The author's full name is not known.

We call him Ray Brad. We think it's only scraps of his name but what is important is that he wrote about book burning ", thus referencing Fahrenheit and Ray Bradbury.

In the film Escape Room , the title of the book is used as a false clue in the first stage that causes the room to heat up to the namesake temperature gradually, pressuring players to find a way out or face a fiery death.

In , the literary book, "The Bookshop", was made into a movie, and one of the characters who read "Fahrenheit " wrote to the bookshop owner, requesting that she send him more books from Ray Bradbury, rather than books on poems and romance.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the novel. For other uses, see Fahrenheit disambiguation.

First edition cover clothbound. Dewey Decimal. Main articles: Fahrenheit film and Fahrenheit film. Main article: Fahrenheit video game.

One interpretation is that he means the 20th century, which would place the novel in at least the 24th century. This sets a lower bound on the time setting.

In later decades, some editions have changed this year to or Laughlin, Charlotte; Lee, Billy C.

Paperback Quarterly. III 3 : The first paperback edition featured illustrations by Joe Mugnaini and contained two stories in addition to the title tale: 'The Playground' and 'And The Rock Cried Out'.

In Bloom, Harold ; Hobby, Blake eds. Civil Disobedience. Infobase Publishing. While Fahrenheit begins as a dystopic novel about a totalitarian government that bans reading, the novel ends with Montag relishing the book he has put to memory.

The New York Times : October 19, Ray Bradbury: A Critical Companion. Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers.

Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. Fahrenheit is considered one of Bradbury's best works. A Companion to Science Fiction.

Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publications. Biography in Sound. Narrated by Norman Rose. NBC Radio News.

December 4, Retrieved February 2, Boyle May 30, LA Weekly website. Retrieved July 9, Bradbury still has a lot to say, especially about how people do not understand his most famous literary work, Fahrenheit , published in Bradbury, a man living in the creative and industrial center of reality TV and one-hour dramas, says it is, in fact, a story about how television destroys interest in reading literature.

Conversations with Ray Bradbury. Commonwealth Club of California. Retrieved March 5, May The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Retrieved August 9, The New York Times. Retrieved August 10, Fahrenheit is set in an unnamed city in the United States, possibly in the Midwest, in some undated future.

Greasley, Philip A. Dictionary of Midwestern Literature. Indiana University Press. Fahrenheit is not set in any specific locale Readings on Fahrenheit Literary Companion Series.

Montag does not realize at first that she is gone, or that he misses her; he simply feels that something is the matter. The Mechanical Hound is an eight-legged glass and metal contraption that serves as a surveillance tool and programmable killing machine for the firemen, who use it to track down suspected book hoarders and readers.

Montag's new neighbor, the sixteen-year-old Clarisse, appears in only a few scenes at the beginning of the novel. The Digital Antiquarian.

Retrieved July 10, News and World Report. Associated Press. Retrieved August 3, The View from the Cheap Seats.

He called the Los Angeles fire department and asked them at what temperature paper burned. Fahrenheit , somebody told him.

He had his title. It didn't matter if it was true or not. Retrieved February 11, Forest Service U. Department of Agriculture.

The Library Book. Facts on File Library of American Literature. He 'wept' when he learned at the age of nine that the ancient library of Alexandria had been burned.

Greenwood Publishing Group. The Big Read. Well, we should learn from history about the destruction of books. When I was fifteen years old, Hitler burned books in the streets of Berlin.

And it terrified me because I was a librarian and he was touching my life: all those great plays, all that great poetry, all those wonderful essays, all those great philosophers.

So, it became very personal, didn't it? Then I found out about Russia burning the books behind the scenes. Montag's inner emotional and moral journey from a character who burns books gleefully and with a smile on his face to someone who is willing to risk his career, his marriage, his house, and eventually his life for the sake of books is extremely compelling.

That this man, product of a culture that devalues reading and values easy, thoughtless entertainments designed to deaden the mind and prevent serious thought, could come to find literature so essential that he would kill for it!

Something about that really spoke to me. It raises the question: why? What is it about books, about poetry, about literature that is so essential to us?

There is no doubt in my mind that it is essential, if not for all individuals although I find it hard to imagine life without books, I know there are some people who don't read for pleasure, bizarre as that seems to me , then for society.

Why should that be? Books don't contain any hard-and-fast answers to all of life's questions. They might contain great philosophical Truths, but only subjectively so -- there will always be someone who will argue and disagree with whatever someone else says.

In fact, as Captain Beatty, the evil fire chief, points out, no two books agree with each other. What one says, another contradicts.

So what, then, is their allure? What is it that made Mildred's silly friend start to weep when Montag read the poem "Dover Beach" aloud to her?

Where does the power of literature come from? I think the reason that books are so important to our lives and to the health of our society -- of any society -- is not because they give us answers, but because they make us ask the questions.

Books -- good books, the books that stay with you for years after you read them, the books that change your view of the world or your way of thinking -- aren't easy.

They aren't facile. They aren't about surface; they're about depth. They are, quite literally, thought-provoking.

They require complexity of thought. They require effort on the part of the reader. You get out of a book what you put into the reading of it, and therefore books satisfy in a way that other types of entertainment do not.

And they aren't mass-produced. They are individual, unique, gloriously singular. They are each an island, much-needed refuges from an increasingly homogeneous culture.

I'm glad I read Fahrenheit , even if the ending was rather bleak. It challenged me and made me think, stimulated me intellectually.

We could all do with a bit of intellectual stimulation now and then; it makes life much more fulfilling.

View all 40 comments. Shelves: sci-fi , reviewed-for-fantasy-book-review , 5-star-reads. If knowledge was burnt, then the people would be left in a complete state of utter innocent ignorance.

There would be no room for free thought, that way they could be told anything about history and themselves. If all books were burnt, then they are just sheep to be led into a future dictated by the government.

To make it worse the men who do it enjoy it. Books have become illegal; thus, owning them is a form of disobedience against the state and a violation of the law.

The books are burnt by a special group of firefighters, yes firefighters, which hunt readers mercilessly. When they find them, they burn their beloved collection and leave them to die.

One woman burns with her books by her own choosing rather than submit to ignorance. And they cannot understand why somebody would fight to the death to defend the written word.

Guy Montag is one such firefighter. He lives a mundane life with an equally mundane partner. He carries out the book burnings, like the others, without a second thought until one day an innocent young girl changes his life forever.

She is his next-door neighbour and she is a closet book reader; she asks him a series of questions that makes him realise how stupid and worthless his existence is.

He takes solace in a collection of books he has stolen whilst on the job, a symbol that he and the world could one day be free.

The knowledge he gains changes his perception of the world forever. Books have fallen out of favour as other mediums have taken priority over them.

People have become hostile to books because they feel inferior when faced with an educated reader; thus, if they are removed forever everyone will be the same and minorities will be removed.

Individuality would die. Consequently, when Guy begins reading, he does not know what to do anymore; he has been conditioned to act in a certain way, and when liberty presents itself, he is reluctant and confused by his new knowledge.

He is a reluctant hero but a hero, nonetheless. This really is required reading for anyone who is serious about science fiction and dystopian fiction because it really is one of the best in both genres.

View all 36 comments. As I write this review, the year is We do not live in a perfect world; in fact, in many ways we don't even live in a good world.

But one thing I believe with all my heart is that we live in a world which, on the whole, is better than it was fifty years ago.

Now, I know I'm writing with limited perspective and that progression and development hasn't been the same all over the globe and even the definition of those words can change depending on what part of the world you live in.

But here's As I write this review, the year is But here's what I do know: the average world life expectancy is higher, the infant mortality rate is lower, access to education is greater and the amount of countries that hold regular, fair elections has increased.

On average, people today are smarter than they were fifty years ago. And I know this is where older generations throw up their hands in indignation and start yelling about how exams were much harder in "their day" and they really had to work for it.

I am not disputing this, I have no idea if it's true or not. But what is true is that more people today than ever before are going on to further education after high school, the barriers that once stopped the working class from being as smart as society's more privileged members are slowly starting to break down bit by bit.

Literacy rates have been on the rise the whole world over: It's true. We have entered the age of computers and electronics, social networking and personal media players And this is the main reason why I think Bradbury's dystopian tale is out of date and ineffective.

The author was writing at a time when technology was really starting to get funky, the digital age was still decades away but people were doing all kinds of crazy things like listening to music with little cones plugged into their ears.

Readers often choose to view Bradbury's story as one about censorship instead of technology because that allows a more modern reader to connect with the world portrayed.

But taken as it was intended, I just don't share the author's sentiments. Not all technology is good, but I'm of the opinion that the good outweighs the bad: medical advancements, entertainment, access to information via the internet I'm the very opposite of a technophobe because, in my opinion, forward is the way to go.

And I'm sure it's because of the age I was born into, but I cannot relate to the apprehension that Bradbury feels when he tells of this true story note: this is not in the book : "In writing the short novel Fahrenheit I thought I was describing a world that might evolve in four or five decades.

But only a few weeks ago, in Beverly Hills one night, a husband and wife passed me, walking their dog. I stood staring after them, absolutely stunned.

The woman held in one hand a small cigarette-package-sized radio, its antenna quivering. From this sprang tiny copper wires which ended in a dainty cone plugged into her right ear.

There she was, oblivious to man and dog, listening to far winds and whispers and soap-opera cries, sleep-walking, helped up and down curbs by a husband who might just as well not have been there.

This was not fiction. I have talked to people that fifty years ago I would never have known, I have learned about different cultures and ways of life because I have access to most areas of the world through the web.

So, no, I'm not scared of this so-called technological threat that is somehow going to turn our brains to mush and create a society where we cannot concentrate long enough to read a book.

And here is where I finally get on to details of this novel. What I am supposed to believe in here is that - because of technology - humanity has become so stupid that they couldn't concentrate on books.

So books were simplified at first for easier understanding, then banned, then burnt. I am okay with the realistic aspect of "people have short attention spans because of technology so they don't want to read books", but why burn books?

I don't see why this would need to happen and why it would become a criminal offense to have books in your home. This is where I understand why so many people prefer to apply this novel's message to censorship, because it works so much better that way.

The argument for the technological side of it is weak - even for the time in question. The best thing about this whole book is the discussion about the phoenix and the comparisons made between the legendary bird and humanity: in the same way that the bird dies in flames only to be reborn again from the ashes, humanity constantly repeats mistakes made throughout history and never seems to learn from them.

Secondly, to give credit where it's due, the writing is suitably creepy for a dystopian society and I understand why people who do actually share Bradbury's concerns would be caught up in the novel's atmosphere.

But, overall, this wasn't a great dystopian work for me, I didn't agree with the point it was trying to sell me and I don't think it made a very successful case for it.

Furthermore, I had some problems with the pacing. The book is split into three parts and the first two are much slower and uneventful than the last one - which seems to explode with a fast sequence of events in a short amount of time and pages.

View all 99 comments. You can check out thousands of better reviews here and across the internet, but here is all you really need to know This is one of the best books ever written.

This is one of my favorite books of all time. This is the third time I've read it. I audiobooked it this time. Every line of Fahrenheit is beautifully written.

The beginning, middle, and ending If you consider yourself a fan of science fiction or dystopian novels o You can check out thousands of better reviews here and across the internet, but here is all you really need to know If you consider yourself a fan of science fiction or dystopian novels or classic literature or banned books or books high-schoolers read or thought-provoking books, and you have not read this book Stop reading this review.

Put down your laptop, your phone, your iPad, your mouse and keyboard, your floppy disk drive, your PlayStation 4, your Smart TV remote, whatever.

Just stop. Grab your car keys, hop on a bus, walk Dash frantically through the aisles, locate the fiction section, maybe science fiction.

Maybe just ask someone who works there. Find a copy of this book. It's written by Ray Bradbury, but my God, if you don't know that by now Demand a copy of this book from the bookstore, happily open up your purse or wallet and pay whatever price they make you pay for a copy of this book.

Don't ask any questions. Don't have them put it in a bag for you. Don't get a copy of your receipt.

Just hand over the money and get the hell out of there. Dump all of your spare change you've collected onto the counter.

Tap into your k if you need to. Rush home and instantly sit down in your easy chair or whatever it is you like to sit, lay, or stand on while reading.

The bathtub perhaps. A recliner. A porch swing. It really doesn't matter. Pour a glass of wine or grab a beer. Pour a glass of wine AND grab a beer.

Then, in one sitting just plow the hell right through this book. Just breathe it all in like the cool, salty ocean air. Let it sink down deep into the depths of who you are as a person living as a human being in the world right here on Earth.

Let it just smack you right in the mouth with how awesome it is. Let it punch you right in the jaw with how mind-blowing it is.

Let it leave you lying on the floor with your mouth wide open trying to figure out what in God's name just happened to you.

Let it elevate itself high above pretty much every other book you've ever read, maybe all the way to the top of that damned prestigious mountain, and let it hoist its flag into the soil of your mind and proclaim to every other book ever written that it is king of literature.

Other books can bow down and bring burnt offerings to it. It shall reign forevermore. Don't wait to get it from the library.

Don't even think about ordering it on Amazon, and I don't even give a damn if you have Prime and woohoo look at me I can get it shipped in two days.

One day shipping if I pay a few bucks! Get a physical copy of the book. Don't settle for reading text on your Kindle or whatever it is you digitize books into.

Get up now. I don't care if it's late and the bookstore is closed. Go wait outside like it's Black Freaking Friday.

I don't care if you're the only one out there all night. Are you a reader or not? Do you care about books?

How have you not read this yet? What's the matter with you? Why are you still reading this? Why haven't you left yet? I love Fahrenheit And I love you enough to demand that you read it.

Reread it. This is wonderful! This is going to be one of the best days of your life. Maybe the best day of your life!

Are you ready? Can you handle it? Have fun. View all 89 comments. Few appreciate irony as much as I do, so understand that I understand this review.

The message of this book is decent: knowledge should not be censored. However, the rest of the book is utter shit. I found myself actually screaming at several points as Bradbury spent minutes and dozens of metaphors and allusions referring to one insignificant detail of the plot.

It is too damn flowery to be understandable by anyone! In other words, an English teacher's dream. In addition, the story was about the Few appreciate irony as much as I do, so understand that I understand this review.

In addition, the story was about the message not the story in and of itself. Those of you who know me understand that this is that I detest most about classics, tied with how everyone reveres them without reading them.

The Coda and Afterword just add to the confuse making me confused on whether Bradbury is a very hateful man or just a hypocrite.

The main plot of the novel itself is that the majority rule canceled out intellectualism while in the Coda maybe Afterword, I don't remember which was which Bradbury blasts minorities all, including racial, religious, etc.

Oddly enough, his heroes are the minority. Furthermore, the Coda is a hefty "Fuck you" to anyone that wants to critique his work in any way not positive.

Therefore, I feel obliged to respond in turn: "Fuck you, Ray Bradbury. Your writing style is shit and I won't force it on my worst enemy.

If you do need to read this book, I suggest a Cliff Notes version as long as you can appreciate that irony.

View all 70 comments. Matt After reading the novel I have a rather different impression of Bradbury's narrative message.

From the very beginning of the first chapter Bradbury dra After reading the novel I have a rather different impression of Bradbury's narrative message.

From the very beginning of the first chapter Bradbury draws a world where people are afraid to show their true entity hiding it behind a shroud of delusive emotions, endless joy, and levity.

Society that completely lost contact with the reality around it with the help of Mass Media. The governemnt which unleahes wars around the globe, sending men to certain death.

Men whose siblings are drowned in the world of endless joy and woudn't even notice anything. In this book Bradbury indicates that how human history, culture, and mankind's many-many years of experience can be devalued in favour of "fast calories" or careless existense due to the unwillingness to dive deep into melancholy of realistic depictions in some books.

Rather, it's better to think of books in this novel as storage of human thought. People are so afraid of looking into oneself's face that they cheered on creating an institute that would utterly destroy objects of their irritation.

Julianna I thought the same thing. I was shocked while reading the Coda because it was so much bullshit. Jun 20, PM. I cannot decide whether this or "Martian Chronicles" is my favorite This is "The Giver" for adults.

Here, another example of overpraised books that shockingly do live up to the hype. Personal events and not the battlefields of Tolkien-sized scope I mean small occurrences such as breakdowns, unpleasant jobs, below-par relationships If you are a lover of books, this seems like some Dantean form of poetic retribution!

This, a writer's "capacity for collecting metaphors" is absolutely enthralling. I am wholly amazed! His writing tips are genuinely far-out!

View all 23 comments. Bradbury's Fahrenheit is a novel that transcends it's dystopian theme and delivers its cautionary message in a timeless fashion, what made this story compelling in remains provocative.

It is a strident call to arms, a warning siren of darkness always on the perimeter. Critics have tried to make more of this, and certainly it is an archetypal work, but I think its simplicity is its great strength - it is fundamentally about book burning, literally and metaphorically.

A powerful allegory t Bradbury's Fahrenheit is a novel that transcends it's dystopian theme and delivers its cautionary message in a timeless fashion, what made this story compelling in remains provocative.

A powerful allegory that also works well as a prima facie argument against censorship and a good science fiction novel all by itself. Bradbury has stated that the novel is not about censorship, but a story about how television destroys interest in reading literature, which leads to a perception of knowledge as being composed of factoids, partial information devoid of context - and I can see that and in an age of Vine and Twitter this message is all too relevant , but for me the image of the ironic fireman burning books is the endearing story.

This is a book that everyone should read at least once. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies.

It feels like it was written by a teenager, and if I were his teacher I'd give it a B- and not let my daughter date the weird little kid who wrote it.

Its protagonist, Montag, lacks any character; he changes as Bradbury's shitty story requires him to, from the dumbest kid on the world his "The good writers touch life often.

Its protagonist, Montag, lacks any character; he changes as Bradbury's shitty story requires him to, from the dumbest kid on the world his cousin once offered to pay him a dime to fill a sieve with sand and he sat there for ages crying and dumping sand into it - I understand that's a metaphor, but it's a metaphor for a moron to a mastermind telling Faber how to throw the Hound off his scent.

You ever see film of someone skipping a pebble in reverse? Me neither, but I bet it's like this: plop plop skip skip wtf? Each other character exists solely to advance the plot.

There's the hot underage Manic Pixie Dream Girl - "her face fragile milk crystal" - who teaches him how to smell dandelions and whose beauty is harped on endlessly and then disappears off-stage; Faber, who's all of a sudden like best friends and then disappears off-stage; the bonfire circle of retired professors who happen to be right there when he stumbles out of a river looking for them.

There's his wife - "thin as a praying mantis from dieting, and her flesh like white bacon. Does the White Clown love you?

It looks backwards, as conservatives do. Bradbury blames his world's disgust with books on "minorities," what we nowadays call "special interest groups": "Colored people don't like Little Black Sambo.

Burn it. White people don't feel good about Uncle Tom's Cabin. There are some nice moments here. A disturbed and immature but intelligent kid flailing around will hit a few marks.

The central idea? No, no props for that; book-burning was invented centuries ago. But the moment when the TV instructs all citizens to open their doors and look for Montag, that's nice.

And the suicidal Captain Beatty is the book's only living character, although his speech is littered with what I swear are just random quotes.

I even like the idea of a circle of book-readers, each responsible for remembering a certain book - but it's dealt with so lamely here.

Wouldn't it be cooler if these people had to work for it? Point is, those little flashes of competence are so overwhelmed by terrible philosophy and so ill-sketched themselves that I have no idea how this book has escaped the bonfire of apathy, the worst and most blameless fire of all.

It's just a lame, lame book. I wouldn't burn this or any book. But I'll do worse: I'll forget all about it.

Shelves: scifi-future-speculative-fict , dystopian , crime-detective-mystery , canada-and-usa.

Library as cathedral, as all libraries should be - John Rylands Library, Manchester. Bradbury shows us the horror of a hedonistic but unhappy world where books and ideas are banned in the futile pursuit of the illusion of hap Library as cathedral, as all libraries should be - John Rylands Library, Manchester.

Bradbury shows us the horror of a hedonistic but unhappy world where books and ideas are banned in the futile pursuit of the illusion of happiness.

As with A Clockwork Orange see my review HERE , there is a constant tension between the deliciously poetic language and the horrors of the setting.

The intended message of this year-old novel is different: a prescient warning about the addictive power of continuous, passive imbibing from the virtual worlds and interactive screens that are our constant companions.

Reading is a physical, sensual, transformative relationship, not merely a mental process. See this excellent article thanks, Apatt!

Plot and Narrative Structure The plot is well-known: It is set in the near future, where all books are banned because they are elitist and hence cause unhappiness and division.

Instead, the population is fed continuous inane soap operas to lull their minds into soporific approximation of non-unhappiness.

TV really does rot their brains, or at least sap their ability to think for themselves. Firemen no longer put out fires, but instead burn houses where books are found.

Montag is a fireman, so part of the regime. But he is tempted by the unknown promise of what he destroys, takes greater and greater risks, and ends up a fugitive, living rough with other rebels, each of whom has memorised a book so that when things change, they can be rewritten.

Ironically, these people also destroy books - just the physical ones, after they have memorised them. There are three parts: 1.

But at what cost? This review is even more focused on quotes than usual, so I never forget. Light flickered on bits of ruby glass and on sensitive capillary hairs in the nylon-brushed nostrils of the creature that quivered gently, gently, gently, its eight legs spidered under it on rubber-padded paws.

It carried its silence with it. They sat in the hall because the parlour was so empty and gray-looking without its walls lite with orange and yellow confetti.

The way the clouds moved aside and came back, and the way the stars looked, a million of them swimming between the clouds… and the feeling that the sky might fall upon the city and turn it to chalk dust, and the moon go up in red fire.

He was not empty. Each becomes a black butterfly. He and his publishers thought it a boring title, so they called a local fire station and asked what temperature paper burned at.

The firemen put Bradbury on hold while they burned a book, then reported back the temperature, and the rest is history.

He had never thought… it could give as well as take. Instead, the TV shows are specially designed to numb minds to all except vague pleasure.

The public stopped reading of its own accord. And in her ears the little Seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound… coming in on the shore of her unsleeping mind.

The room was indeed empty. The impersonal operation… could gaze into the soul of the person whom he was pumping out.

He could feel the poison working up… His hands were ravenous. And his eyes were beginning to feel hunger, as if they must look at something, anything, everything.

As in filling a vessel drop by drop, there is at last a drop which makes it run over; so in a series of kindnesses there is at last one which makes the heart run over.

The other mystery is Captain Beatty: he is remarkably well-versed in the classics of literature, philosophy and history.

The obvious question is, if you were going to become a book and memorise it for posterity, what would you choose? Would it be cheating to pick "Fahrenheit "?

Should it be for personal comfort or something that will be useful in rebuilding society? The hardest questions is, would you give up everything for literature?

In Summary I love the fact that this book is a paean to the power of the written word: that people will live and die for it, and will wither without the transformative power of fictional worlds and the insights of others.

The lure and love of literature is irrepressible. Books "stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us. And in each case, it's a denial of the dogma that this is the original sin.

See details on imdb here. She intended to rewrite from the point of view of the female characters, but ended up equally fascinated by Truffaut's adaptation - the very process of adapting the book.

It also includes many fascinating and sometimes surprising details about the film, such as Truffaut hand-picking the books that were burned in the opening scene.

But the one was a travesty that exacerbates the common misunderstanding of Bradbury's intended message AND adds a ludicrous new plot in its place.

There is nothing at all about the addictive and mind-numbing allure of superficial soap operas Montag doesn't even have a wife , but there is a weird sciency thing about books being encoded in the DNA of a bird, so they'll live for ever!

It wasn't even well acted or written I presume it didn't improve in the second half. View all 97 comments. Here is a future world where books are banned, and look at this; it has gone to the dogs.

The good are those who read, the bad are those who watch the TV. Yes, this is what we like to read to make us feel all warm inside.

And because of that we are seemingly willing to forgive Bradbury for a lot of things: really poor world-building skills, lacklustre characterisation, inconsistencies.

Oh, and sexism. The women in the books are generally brainwashed bimbos, except of course for the wonder-child Clarisse from the beginning of the book, who is a representation of a very annoying archetype as well.

And you would think that, since the book is mostly an endless roll call of all the authors and books that need to be salvaged from the fire, at least ONE female author would get a mention.

They can all burn for all that Bradbury cares. After all, the secret gang dedicated to preserving the world literary heritage is made up entirely of men.

Now, this to me does look like a very sad world indeed. Go and read Farenheit View all 78 comments. This was my first Ray Bradbury book.

Do you know - that with 1, , ratings, and 28, reviews-I didn't have a clue what to expect from this book?

I may have been the only person living under a rock - down deep beneath the earth -who knew nothing about this story! My Goodness Neil Gaiman wrote the Introduction Just beautiful introduction abou This was my first Ray Bradbury book.

Just beautiful introduction about Fahrenheit being speculative fiction Ray Bradbury was writing about his present, which is our past.

He was warning us about things; some of those things are obvious, and some of them, half a century later, are harder to see.

First: Many readers say 'that readers', should read this book: I agree! Fireman no longer put out fires-- but instead burn houses that have books inside.

The prose is beautiful- powerful - a tribute to the value of books. Ray Bradbury created a world where watching TV is what is consider socializing.

TV is a baby sitter for busy parents. Sounds like present day to me! This is still a concern!!!

One night -one fireman - Guy Montag - meets a young almost 17 year old girl, Clarisse McClellan, who asks Montag, "Do you ever read any of the books you burn?

Towards the end of the copy of this 60th Anniversary edition is "The Story of Fahrenheit ". I found it fascinating. The story about renting typewriters at UCLA library - paying a dime for every half hour to write this story -- had me laughing.

View all 64 comments. Jan 03, Maggie Stiefvater added it Shelves: adult , recommended. View all 3 comments. What does "Fahrenheit " mean to me?

Most of all, it is a declaration of love for books in an era of fast entertainment and instant gratification as a means of political control of the masses.

I used to think Brave New World and - or a combination of those two - had a more accurate take on human mind-slavery in the age of technology than "Fahrenheit ".

But increasingly, I see the world as Bradbury saw it, with people sitting in front of screens, absorbed by meaningless entertainment without purpose or fulfillment, losing their ability to talk to each other.

And with the dialogue, reflection disappears from our homes and schools. Students do "research" without ever touching a book and spit out slogans they find online, but they can't put them into context.

They write their essays on screens and unlearn how to spell. They dream of a career which makes them visible on screens as well: they want to be athletes, singers, movie stars.

Out of the teenagers I asked, only 2 had read a book during their ten weeks of summer holidays, and most of them couldn't even say what they had been doing instead.

Time passes without being noticed in front of a screen - a WALL, as it is called in the novel. If you do not practice the skill of reading and of appreciating literature, it is lost.

The book burning that takes place in "Fahrenheit " is not even necessary in the real world of today. Those rare students that like reading can't share their interest with anyone anymore, and it doesn't spread: "With school turning out more runners, jumpers, racers, tinkerers, grabbers, snatchers, fliers, and swimmers instead of examiners, critics, knowers, and imaginative creators, the word 'intellectual,' of course, became the swear word it deserved to be.

So what have I done myself, hopeless book lover that I am? I have taken to the woods, figuratively speaking, like the characters in "Fahrenheit ".

Barring television screens and computer games - the walls - from my home, I have made sure reading stays alive.

My walls are filled with books, not screens. I waste no opportunity to talk about books with my children, and I make them learn poems by heart.

To develop a lasting love for literature, it has to be nurtured. You are not born a reader, just like you are not born a football player or a dancer.

Accessibility, motivation and training are necessary prerequisites for any interests to form. It takes time and care. Fahrenheit - the temperature at which books burn.

I think Bradbury got that wrong. It is what happened to books in the past, when politicians actively tried to destroy specific books.

There is no need for them to do that anymore. In our world, books drown - in the flood of quick information and easy entertainment. The year of the flood View all 74 comments.

While reading it I realized I did not remember much from the first time. Of all the post-apocalyptic tales I have read, this is probably the simplest yet most terrifying.

Published only 4 years after the book , it is obvious where post WWII fears were driving our mindset. It is also very evident how modern dystopian stories have taken direction from these midth Century classics.

And, in our current political climate, fears like this are coming aground again: war, government control, freedom lost, etc.

If you love modern dystopia, but have not read this. If you are a fan of classics and have not read this. It is not a happy tale - it is deeply disturbing with very little hope, but maybe the more people that are aware of its message the safer our future will be.

There is some really terrifying fan art out there for this book In Ray Bradbury's creepy classic, Montag is your typical modern fireman , burning books for a living with his dedicated gang.

None of that old -fashioned putting out fires, he and a hose full of kerosene and just a little old match, does the trick.

Sets books a blazing, it's more fun too! Besides no one reads anymore and the warm inferno, towering high into the sky, makes a pretty picture, lighting the cold, dark night.

Father was a fireman, so was his grandfather, the family business, you can In Ray Bradbury's creepy classic, Montag is your typical modern fireman , burning books for a living with his dedicated gang.

Father was a fireman, so was his grandfather, the family business, you can call it, Montag didn't really have a choice, tradition must continue.

Coming back from a good evening's work, the fire setter, pardon He discovers his unhappy wife took too many sleeping pills again.

An accident she later claims , maybe even believes. After getting her stomach pumped, Mildred is as good as new, poor Guy, on the long road of life's journey, every step seems in the wrong direction.

Mildred is addicted to wall to wall television, so are her friends the fantasy world negates somewhat the pain and emptiness. Happy shows of course, no others will penetrate the dreams of the ladies, reality is not fun.

Yet doubts come when a nearly 17 -year- old curious girl, a nextdoor neighbor, starts asking Guy Montag, many uncomfortable questions, Clarisse McClellan admits she's crazy.

In the firehouse, Montag spends most of his time playing cards with the fellows, strangely in the future, no women are employed in that noble profession.

But plenty of cigarette smoking, they are real firemen. Captain Beatty starts getting suspicious of Montag, the mechanical pet dog, also, it likes killing rats, the four legged kind I mean, and hates our great hero.

War is in the air , jet bombers are flying around the skies in circles, atomic bombs threaten to rain down and annihilate the so- called civilization.

Not to worry; get back to the TV walls, people and forget. Clarisse mysterious disappears, one ordinary day, she's here, then Finally the forbidden fruit's temptation, becomes quite unbearable , and Montag arriving in a house full of illegal , but strangely attractive books, takes a sample.

Big horrendous mistake, worse, the owner, an old woman, refuses to leave her place and goes literally up in flames with her beloved "friends".

Everyone says it was a shame , but her own fault; no tears should be shed. Afterwards an incident occurs and Guy has to flee for his own life, the relentless mechanical dog is on the hunt.

The petrified Montag jumps into the cold river and peacefully, gently floats down the beautiful stream. Getting out soon after , he sees a fire above, with a group of "Hobos" near the water.

Is that a flash in the sky? This warning of a maybe world, in the years to come , is still relevant today , though so much time has passed.

View all 8 comments. A book, a flamethrower, and a very troubled mind. In a dystopian future, firemen don't put out fires Books, and freethinkers, are burned with a flamethrower without a seconds thought.

Guy Montag, one of these incendiary firemen, after a series of events starts awakening from his long and blind indoctrination. To his horror, he finds an identity and a mind of his own.

But in a completely monitored and subjugated society, thinking can cost your life. One single mistake and Guy may A book, a flamethrower, and a very troubled mind.

One single mistake and Guy may find himself on the other side of the flamethrower A very short novel, with a lot of feel of Orwell's A novel that emphasizes the value of written legacy, books, and free will.

An interesting read, with lots of moments and quotations to remember, but somewhat far from the dazzling experience. What I couldn't grasp was Bradbury's confusing way to describe things, not because of the vocabulary, but because of the phrasing.

Several of them seemed incomprehensible, or incoherent. Maybe I just got one of those weird faulty electronic copies.

Or maybe this was just a book that I may have been able to enjoy much more reading it in spanish. Interesting, but not really enjoyable, and specially not Some important changes to the original plot, but welcomed ones.

Unremarkable acting, at best. Decent effects, considering. Not necessarily a good film, but it does have some redeeming qualities.

Terribly unfaithful to the book.

1 Gedanken zu “451 fahrenheit

  1. Ich denke, dass Sie den Fehler zulassen. Geben Sie wir werden besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

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